Welcome to Aubrey Plaza Online, your only source for everything on the American actress Aubrey Plaza. You may recognize Aubrey from her roles in 'Parks and Recreation', 'Safety Not Guaranteed', 'The To Do List' and 'Legion'. Her upcoming projects include 'The Little Hours', 'Ingrid Goes West' and 'An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn'.

We aim to bring you all the latest news and images relating to Aubrey's acting career, and strive to remain 100% gossip-and-paparazzi-free. Please take a look around and be sure to visit again to stay up-to-date on the latest news, photos and more on Aubrey.
Category: ‘Photoshoots & Portraits’ Category
admin on November 17,2017   /   0 Comments

I have just updated our gallery with outtakes of Aubrey photographed for BuzzFeed UK to promote the release of “Ingrid Goes West” in the United Kingdom (November 17, in other words — today!). She did a really funny interview where she had to reply to 31 rapid-fire questions about herself — part of which you can find below, but be sure to check out the original publication (here) for more.

Have you ever been mistaken for another celebrity?: “Yeah, a bunch of people at one point thought I was Alison Brie on Community. In airports a lot, they’d come up to me and be like, “I love your work on Community!” And I’d go, “Thank you very much.”

What’s the biggest lie you’ve ever told? “I think when I was in fourth or fifth grade, on the playground, I used to tell people that my dad owned the Plaza Hotel, because I thought they’d think I was cool. No one believed me and it was a terrible lie, but a big one for a young child.

What’s the last thing you cried at? “Okja – the first 10 minutes, and then I turned it off. I cried within the first 10 minutes, so I was like, I can’t watch this movie.

What advice would you give to your teenage self? “I would say stop getting your hair cut like a middle-aged real estate agent woman. It doesn’t look good. The boys don’t like it.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given? “Go big or go home! Right out of the womb, my mom said that to me. As a toddler. She said, “If you’re gonna fuck up, just make sure it’s a big fuckup.”

Have you ever freaked out about meeting a celebrity? “Yeah. Nick Offerman brought me to see his wife in a musical at Carnegie Hall one time, and Patrick Wilson was in it, and I could barely talk because I was so excited to meet him. I made a fool out of myself and he thought I was a loser.

What’s one ambition you have yet to accomplish? “Oh, so many. Grammy. Tony. Emmy. ESPY? Is that an award? Any award, pretty much. No, I don’t care about awards. Just cooking a really great dinner, I guess. I never feel good about what I cook. But also, Grammy.

What’s one thing people would be surprised to know about you? “That I’m really sensitive on the inside! I don’t know, I don’t want anyone to know anything about me. I love small, confined spaces. I love being buckled in. That came out weird. I love seatbelts!

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 49 [+3]

admin on November 05,2017   /   0 Comments

Sunday Times Style — […] In Plaza’s new film, Ingrid Goes West, we see our global Insta addiction taken to its silliest, wildest, scariest extremes. Ingrid (an excellent Plaza) is a loner, languishing somewhere in America’s Midwest. Scrolling through the ’gram one night, she comes across the account of Taylor Sloane, your quintessential hipster Californian. Taylor (Elizabeth Olsen) is an Insta-type we know all too well: vintage finds, avocado toasts, gorgeous boyfriend, artful book choices and a slew of #blessed. Whereupon Ingrid does the completely logical thing: she moves out west and stalks Taylor, copies her and infiltrates her life.

[…]

It does succeed in capturing a very specific time that we’re in,” Plaza says with typical understatement. The actress, 33, has made a career out of various deadpan stylings, although she is now evolving into more nuanced, dramatic roles. As April Ludgate in Amy Poehler’s adorable sitcom Parks and Recreation, she was the sullen, perma-scowling intern whose furious looks to camera managed more than a thousand gags. Add to that star turns in the likes of Funny People or Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, and she’s become one of America’s brightest young stars, in her own dark way. Although she refuses to reduce Ingrid to some weird comic caricature.

I think everyone can relate to where Ingrid is coming from,” she reasons, sitting in the foyer of the London hotel where she is staying. Dressed down in a blue chunky jumper, blue jeans and red Converse, she is inevitably smaller than you’d imagine, but more beautiful too, with almond eyes and a slightly wonky mouth. When she talks, it all goes a bit Picasso: the eyes and the mouth do all the work, everything else quite still. Does she mean we can relate to Ingrid’s loneliness?

Yeah. Just wanting to be like someone else, or wanting someone to like you so badly, or being obsessed with someone else’s identity. Just focusing all of your energy on somebody else’s life online — I think that’s the thing that people do. They go down these rabbit holes on Instagram or Facebook, and you spend a lot of energy looking at people’s lives, and you can’t help but compare yourself to them, and it just feeds this weird toxic part of your brain.

(read the rest of the article at the source)

Press > 2017 > The Sunday Times Style (November 5) [+1]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 47 [+5]
admin on August 11,2017   /   0 Comments

LA WeeklyIt’s Aubrey Plaza’s 33rd birthday, and she’s curled up on a couch in a deafeningly quiet, concrete-walled room at the Line hotel in Koreatown. She hugs her knees to her chest. Her T-shirt features a hyper-realistic image of Nicolas Cage’s face, and I can just see his toothy, maniacal smile peeking out from between her legs — it’s unnerving. Her hands fidget, knotting and unknotting a black string attached to a Santa Muerte charm. The actor hit stardom with her sardonic slacker character April on the NBC show Parks and Recreation and, like many TV stars on long-running shows, she has found it difficult to escape her monster creation. With a recent succession of mold-smashing projects — Legion, The Little Hours and Ingrid Goes West — she’s about to leave April behind. But who will she become? “If Andy Kaufman is alive, he should come and find me,” Plaza tells me. Kaufman is one of Plaza’s greatest influences. The comic actor died from cancer in 1984 but he melted so deeply into his myriad personas that there are people who still believe he is alive and simply playing a long con on his suffering audiences. If you’ve only ever seen Plaza on the uplifting comedy Parks & Rec, the Kaufman reference may not immediately resonate for you. But to friends and colleagues, she is a Loki trickster who revels in absurdity.

[…]

“I’m such a people pleaser that my natural reaction in interviews and things is to give people what they want. It’s like I’m a robot,” Plaza says. “‘Oh, these people want me to say something weird or mean or sarcastic, so I just do that. That’ll make them happy.’ I’m just now getting better at feeling more comfortable in my own skin, but it can be hard when people are projecting ideas onto you at full speed, constantly.”

[…]

“Nick Offerman knew every single person on set’s name, [he] was the most generous man to be working with, and if I would have a bad day and be annoyed or acting like a brat or whatever, he would be the first one to say, ‘Just remember we’re on network television, and our lives are spectacular,'” Plaza says, offering an ace Offerman impression. “And I’d be like, ‘Of course! Thank you. Fucking of course our lives are spectacular!'”

(read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 43 [+3]
admin on August 10,2017   /   0 Comments

TIME “It’s beautiful. Should I take a picture for my Instagram?” Aubrey Plaza stands up to snap an iPhone photo of the avocado toast that’s just arrived at our table. She carefully moves our water glasses to declutter the shot, which she says she’ll post the week her new movie, Ingrid Goes West, hits theaters. In the film, her character also uploads a perfect portrait of the overpriced green grub to her Instagram, with the aim of impressing a social-media influencer she wants to befriend. Now Plaza shakes her head and laughs, saying, “This is stupid.” She’s humoring me, because I’ve asked her to meet me–in honor of the film’s theme of millennial social-media obsession–at lower Manhattan’s Café Gitane, the birthplace of the food trend that’s become an Instagram cliche.

[…]

“I want to be Catwoman more than anything,” Plaza says, eyes widening, when I ask her what she wants to do next. “I made myself Catwoman in Ingrid,”–she’s referring to some bedroom role-playing with co-star O’Shea Jackson Jr., who plays Ingrid’s Batman-infatuated landlord–“because I was like, This might be as close as I get.”

I ask what she’d be doing if she weren’t in show business, and she says she’d be an agent. “I’m always telling other people what they should do in their careers,” she explains. But then she says that’s a cheap response, since agents are acting adjacents, and settles on an alternative: “Maybe I would run a haunted bed-and-breakfast somewhere and be a weird hotel woman.”

(read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 40 [+1]
admin on August 09,2017   /   0 Comments

W – Mid-way through Ingrid Goes West, the so-called “Instagram” movie that premiered to rave reviews at the Sundance Film Festival in January and will finally hit theaters on Friday, Aubrey Plaza, mid-carpool karaoke—and to K-Ci & JoJo, no less—shoots a glance at Elizabeth Olsen that sticks with you long past the credits. It’s a look of equal parts envy, lust, desperation, and infatuation—in a word, it’s unhinged. And it’s what makes Ingrid Goes West one of the summer’s most captivating movies.

[…]

How did you first find this project? Aubrey Plaza: I was sent the script through my agent. He got his hands on it really fast, and I kind of knew the director and writer [Matt Spicer] socially, so I reached out to him on my own and got together with him. I was just very aggressive about it. I just loved the script. It’s a beautifully written script. It’s very specific, and I thought it was so rare to have a story from one character’s perspective. I liked the subject matter, also, and thought it was really timely and a really beautiful human story, but also a great commentary on what’s happening right now with social media and society.

[…]

Aubrey, were there any fictional characters that you looked to to help you tap into the mind of Ingrid? AP: There were definitely movies that we thought of, at least tonally. [Martin Scorsese’s] King of Comedy was a big one; just the idea of having that person who is obsession-worthy. But there weren’t any specifics characters.

(read the rest of the interview at the source)

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2017 > Session 39 [+4]